NEW LOGO, NEW LOCATION, SAME GREAT CONFERENCE
FRISCO • FEBRUARY 22–24
Early Bird Registration: $395/DVM members, $495/DVM non-members • $175/LVT members, $200/Hospital Staff non-members by January 21
SESSIONS

The TVMA Conference Planning Committee is busy arranging the best and most up-to-date sessions and classes on issues, trends and practice needs affecting you. This program is still under construction so check back frequently for regular updates.

ADVOCACY

Make It Personal: How to Advance Your Advocacy Approach

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Ashley Morgan, DVM, CAE, and Kent McClure, DVM

Most lawmakers have little knowledge of veterinary medicine. Federal and state lawmakers routinely offer bills that impose new stipulations or regulations on veterinary medicine. While some bills are proactively sought and supported by the veterinary profession, other bills may have severe impacts on veterinary economics, the scope of veterinary practice, and animal health and welfare. To make smart, insightful legislation and regulation, lawmakers and staff must hear from those most knowledgeable about the real impacts. That's you!

This engaging workshop will give you knowledge of the legislative process and effective intervention. Plus, it will hone your advocacy skills while bolstering your confidence in your ability to effectively advance the AVMA and Texas VMA's legislative agendas. This isn't a civics class. It's an engaged discussion on pertinent legislative issues relevant to veterinary medicine and grassroots lobbying. And it includes coaching on the realities of meeting with legislators.

Growing Old with Grace: What We Know About CDS in Pets, I Saw the Signs! Medical Differentials for Signs of Cognitive Dysfunction in Senior Pets

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Gary Landsberg, DVM, DACVB

I saw the Signs!: With this seminar the participant will be able to identify, recognize and understand:

  • The clinical signs of cognitive dysfunction as represented by the acronym DISHAA.
  • The methodology and applications for neuropsychological tests in identifying the learning and memory deficits associated with brain aging, and how these tests have been used to assess the effect of therapeutic products.
  • The prevalence and risk factors associated with cognitive dysfunction.
  • The metabolic changes and pathology associated with brain aging and cognitive decline.

Let’s Treat the Signs: With this seminar the participant will be able to identify, recognize and understand the use of:

  • Environmental enrichment in the prevention, management and treatment of cognitive decline and cognitive dysfunction.
  • Pharmaceutical, supplements and functional foods available for the management and treatment of cognitive dysfunction, their mode of action and rationale for use, and evidence of efficacy.

What Caused the Signs:

  • Participants will learn to identify the medical differentials for pets presenting with signs of cognitive dysfunction, both by the medical conditions and the behavioral signs they cause, and by the behavioral signs and the medical conditions that might cause them.
  • Attendees will learn the role that veterinary personnel must play in screening to identify these clinical signs.

COMPANION ANIMAL

Anesthesia Fatalities, Adverse Events and Accidents in Small Animal Anesthesia—Can We Do Better?

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Sheilah Robertson, BVMS, PhD, DECVAA, DACAW, CVA, MRCVS

The risk of anesthetic related death in dogs and cats has decreased since the last comparable survey in the mid-1980s but these numbers compare poorly to data for humans where the anesthetic related death rate is reported to be between 0.02 and 0.005%. Differences in the standards of anesthesia including training of those administering anesthesia, having a person dedicated to anesthesia alone, and sophisticated monitoring equipment are likely the reason between the human and animal data, more than species differences alone. A recent retrospective study focused on a high volume spay-neuter clinic reported the risk of mortality in cats as 0.05% and dogs as 0.009% with the latter approaching mortality rates in human anesthesia. The risk of mortality in females (dog or cat) was twice that of males. The lower risk of death in these patients compared to the Confidential Enquiry into Perioperative Small Animal Fatality (CEPSAF) study is probably due to a combination of factors including the young, healthy population and the experience and skills of veterinarians that specialize in specific surgical procedures. Most deaths occur post-operatively; in the CEPSAF study 47% of deaths in dogs occur during this time and in cats the figure is 61%. Within the post-operative period, the most critical time appears to be the first three hours after the end of anesthesia. Cardiovascular or respiratory causes accounted for the majority of deaths in dogs and cats. Increasing age, health status, obesity are risk factors. Monitoring the pulse or pulse rate decreases the risk of death in cats.

As in human anesthetic related deaths, operator error plays a role, for example when the pressure relief valve of the anesthesia machine is left closed. The use of checklists has been introduced into many medical settings including veterinary anesthesia and surgery and have been shown to decrease mistakes. With identified risk factors and implementation of check lists it should be possible to decrease mortality rates in small animal practice with appropriate intervention.

The Impact of Obesity on Anesthesia

An estimated one in three dogs and cats are overweight or obese; these numbers have been increasing over the past decade and show no signs of slowing down. Obesity is an important medical issue in humans and animals with many widespread harmful effects. Overweight pets have abnormal respiratory and cardiac function, are at risk for metabolic and endocrine disorders, exacerbation of degenerative joint disease and cognitive dysfunction. Research data from humans and animal models of obesity indicate that one common denominator of obesity-related disorders is low grade inflammation. Obese pets will require anesthesia for a wide range of procedures both elective and emergent and are considered high-risk patients. In cats, obesity was related to a higher incidence of anesthetic related death in a large multi-center study. Drug requirements are altered by changes in body composition as are intravenous fluid rates. Obese animals may require assistance with respiration especially when supine and are at risk for hypoxemia and hypercapnia. Most anesthetic related deaths occur in the first 3 hours after anesthesia and this population are at risk for airway obstruction and hypoxemia. Other issues include changes in coagulation and thermoregulation.

Anesthesia for the Golden Oldies—Why Are They Different?

As animals age there is a decrease in the functional reserve of all major organs. These changes combined with changes in body composition including decreased lean muscle mass, increased adipose tissue, decreased blood volume and total body water alters the requirements and responses to anesthetic drugs. Older pets also have a limited ability to thermoregulate making hypothermia and its complications (delayed recovery, increased bleeding) a real threat. The requirements of inhalant agents are significantly reduced in older animals therefore the anesthetist must monitor the depth of anesthesia closely. Anesthetic and sedative drugs that can be titrated, reversed and are short acting are ideal for older patients. Local anesthetic techniques should be incorporated whenever possible. Careful handling of this patient population is important as many will have underlying degenerative joint disease.

Antimicrobial Resistance: The Challenge in Dogs and Cats, Medical Cannabinoids

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Dawn Boothe, DVM, PhD



Feline Constipation: More Than Just a Pain in the Arse

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 • 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (4 credits)

Craig Webb, DVM, PhD, DACVIM

Have you ever been constipated? Have you ever considered it a terminal disease? It can be for cats! This discussion will provide practitioners with an early and effective approach to the diagnosis, and most importantly, the treatment of constipation in cats.

Fecal Transplantation: What’s Coming Down the Pipeline 

This discussion will review the history, the theory, and the potential benefits of the ‘ultimate probiotic’ in certain conditions. Dr. Webb will then provide practitioners with the logistics and technical considerations necessary to perform fecal transplants in appropriate patients.

Feline Triaditis: Facts or Philosophy?

In this presentation, Dr. Webb will review the fascinating history behind the ongoing battle between Occam’s Razor and Hickam’s Dictum that dominates our approach to clinical cases to this day. This will be followed by a brief review of highlights and practice approach to the 3 components of feline triaditis; cholangitis, pancreatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease.

Growing Old with Grace: What We Know About CDS in Pets, I Saw the Signs! Medical Differentials for Signs of Cognitive Dysfunction in Senior Pets

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Gary Landsberg, DVM, DACVB

I saw the Signs!: With this seminar the participant will be able to identify, recognize and understand:

  • The clinical signs of cognitive dysfunction as represented by the acronym DISHAA.
  • The methodology and applications for neuropsychological tests in identifying the learning and memory deficits associated with brain aging, and how these tests have been used to assess the effect of therapeutic products.
  • The prevalence and risk factors associated with cognitive dysfunction.
  • The metabolic changes and pathology associated with brain aging and cognitive decline.

Let’s Treat the Signs: With this seminar the participant will be able to identify, recognize and understand the use of:

  • Environmental enrichment in the prevention, management and treatment of cognitive decline and cognitive dysfunction.
  • Pharmaceutical, supplements and functional foods available for the management and treatment of cognitive dysfunction, their mode of action and rationale for use, and evidence of efficacy.

What Caused the Signs:

  • Participants will learn to identify the medical differentials for pets presenting with signs of cognitive dysfunction, both by the medical conditions and the behavioral signs they cause, and by the behavioral signs and the medical conditions that might cause them.
  • Attendees will learn the role that veterinary personnel must play in screening to identify these clinical signs.

Intro to Rehab: How Can PTs Find Things DVMs Miss

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 1:30-5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Janice Huntingford, DVM, DACVSMR, CVA, CVPP, CCRT, CAVCA

This presentation focuses on how to improve your lameness exam, orthopedic exam, neurological and myofascial exam to pinpoint problems in your patients. Common problems and regional areas will be highlighted as well as an introduction to treatment.

Lasers: What We Know and What Evidence Exists

Laser therapy not only reduces the inflammatory process - it has ability to promote and enhance healing in addition to treating signs. This presentation is a comprehensive look at incorporating laser therapy into the multimodal management of the painful pet. Discussion includes goals in treating painful patients, maladaptive pain and its relationship to the arthritic pet, and photobiomodulation and pain management for osteoarthritis via laser therapy. A discussion of the different classes of laser and the evidence for laser us! Current research papers will be included in this presentation. Participants will learn the science behind why and how photobiomodulation therapy works and the current literature supporting its use. They will also learn about the different classes of laser and how they can be used in the treatment of pain in small animals.

Rehab Techniques for the Non-Rehab Practice

Physical rehabilitation for veterinary patients expedites return to normal function, pain relief, and encouragement of optimal health for patients suffering from orthopedic, neurologic, and chronic disease. Patients that use rehabilitation programs range from overweight pets and those recovering from injuries and surgeries to senior pets with chronic, debilitating conditions and agility, field trial, hunting, and service dogs.

Physical rehabilitation can be an invaluable addition to a veterinary practice with relatively low overhead costs. This session provides an overview of physical rehabilitation modalities and focuses on incorporating these modalities into your practice.

Problematic Feline Skin Diseases

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Karen Moriello, DVM, DACVD

This morning seminar series will focus on three of the most common problematic feline skin diseases. The goal of each session is to provide an evidence based, but still practical, diagnostic and treatment program. The session will end with a “Dermatology on Demand” Q&A session.

  • Feline Dermatophytosis: Fact vs Fiction and How to Battle Dr. Google (60 min.)
  • Chronic Feline Otitis: When It’s Not Mites and It’s Not a Polyp (60 min
  • The Dreaded Chronically Itchy Cat (60 min)
  • Dermatology on Demand: This is a Q&A session and anything goes (including dog questions!). During the morning session participants can submit questions to the moderator and the speaker will answer as many as possible (30 min)

Small Animal Respiratory Diseases

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Jonathan Dear, MAS, DVM, DACVIM (SAIM)

Bacterial pneumonia remains one of the most common clinical diagnoses in dogs with either acute or chronic respiratory diseases. New research suggests a complex relationship between viral respiratory diseases and development of bacterial pneumonia in dogs. This session will review the various common viral respiratory diseases, interplay between host and environmental factors, diagnosis and treatment challenges and the most successful treatment options.

Thought on Managing Uveitis

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 7:00-10:00 p.m. (3 credits)

Robert Munger, DVM, DACVO

Uveitis quite simply refers to an inflammation of the uveal structures (iris, ciliary body, and choroid) inside the eye. While the definition may be simple, the disease may be quite complex and the methods of treating the inflammation can vary from very simple to extremely complex. Diagnosis, treatment and management options will be discussed as well as various cases reviewed and openly discussed.

Under Pressure: Systemic Hypertension, Endocrine Hypertension and Cardiovascular Effects of Steroids

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Jessica Ward, DVM, DACVIM

Systemic hypertension, or high blood pressure, is common condition in older dogs and cats. Systemic hypertension is a pathophysiologic link between diseases that CAUSE high systemic vascular resistance and the organ systems that are AFFECTED BY high blood pressure. The first portion of this integrated session will discuss the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of systemic hypertension, with special focus on endocrine diseases that can contribute to high blood pressure. The second portion of the session will discuss the ways in which endogenous and exogenous glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, and sex steroids can affect the cardiovascular system and blood pressure, including the concept of “steroid-associated” congestive heart failure. The third portion of the session will involve interactive case studies of blood pressure abnormalities in cardiovascular disease, allowing attendees to apply the content discussed previously.

Update on Fever of Unknown Origin, Infectious Causes of Diarrhea in Cats: Diagnosis and Treatment

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (4 credits)

Michael Lappin, DVM

A number of feline blood borne agents have been grown, amplified or have induced serum antibodies in the serum of cats with clinical signs like fever. The purpose of this comprehensive review is provide an update on the diagnosis and management of fever associated with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Bartonella spp, Ehrlichia spp., haemoplasmas, and Rickettsia spp. infections of cats.

Using Culture and Susceptibility Data to Make Therapeutic Decisions, Treatment of UTI in Dogs (E. Coli Virulence and Resistance, Designing the Dosing Regimen)

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 8:00 - 10:30 a.m. (2.5 credits)

Dawn Boothe, DVM, PhD



In's and Out's of Traveling and Transporting Pets and Livestock

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (1.5 credits)

Mayrn Ptaschinski, DVM (Infectious Disease Control Institute), Ron Lane (Globalvetlink) and Dee Ellis (Infectious Disease Control Institute)

Help answer your clients questions by siting in on this panel of experts as they discuss the rules and regulations of travel by air and by ground.

LARGE ANIMAL

Antibiotic Selection and Use: Making the Most of the Opportunities Our Selections Afford; Drug Delivery: Two Topic Areas Every Veterinarian Needs to Grow Their Knowledge Base; Determining Your Consultation Recommendations; Heat Stress: Heat and Management in Beef Cattle

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Dee Griffin, DVM



Review of Lower Limb Soft Tissue Injuries and Treatment

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Reese Hand, DVM, DACVS



Sheep and Goat Parasitism and Nutrition

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30 - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

David Pugh, DVM, MA, DACT

This lecture will cover diet, nutrition, and management programs used for the diagnosis, treatment, attempted prevention of internal and some external parasites in sheep and goats.

How I Hired My Last Associate

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 8:00 - 9:30 a.m. (1.5 credits)

Panelist: Joe Hillhouse, DVM and Steve Kennedy, DVM

The challenges of hiring an associate are real and may be stressful. Come hear how these large animal practitioners approach hiring and share your experiences as well.

Pain Management in Horses: Anything New?; Case-Based Approach to Equine Pain Management; Foal Emergency Management and Prognosis; When Optho Horses Have Systemic Problems: A Case-Based Approach

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 • 8:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (4 credits)

Chris Sanchez, DVM, PhD

This is a lecture presentation given in four parts and will discuss:

  1. Methods for evaluating and treating pain in horses
  2. Identifying facial characteristics of pain in horses and choosing an approach to manage pain in different clinical situations
  3. Approaches to common neonatal emergencies and the data available for short- and long-term prognosis for each along with identifying which diseases offer good vs. poor long-term prognosis
  4. Case-based approach to ophthalmic manifestations of systemic disease and systemic manifestations or complications associated with ophthalmic disease. There also will be information regarding risk factors for common complications in horses with ophthalmic disease and common ophthalmic signs associated with certain systemic disease.

The Bovine Abdomen: I’m In …Now What? Umbilical Surgery: Abscesses to Omphalophlebitis

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (2 credits)

Amanda Hartnack, DVM, MS, DACVS





The Equine Eye Exam: How to Find the Cause and Treat the Painful Horse Eye

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Chris Nettune, DVM

This session will cover the basic equine eye exam as well as equine corneal ulcers and diagnosing and managing Uveitis.



HOSPITAL STAFF

All Things Arterial; The Midas Touch: Arterial Sampling and Catheterization; A-B-Gs, Easy as 1-2-3: Blood Gas Interpretation; A Fine Art-Line: Direct Arterial Blood Pressure Monitoring

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. (3 credits)

Meghan Dakin, DVT, VTS (ECC)

Have you been thinking of incorporating invasive monitoring techniques into your ER or anesthesia practice? Are you unsure where to start? Join Meg Dakin, DVT, VTS, as she discusses the ins and outs of arterial blood sampling, arterial catheterization, interpretation of blood gas analysis (arterial or venous) and direct arterial blood pressure monitoring.

The Amazing Potential of Dentistry to Increase Revenue in General Practice

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Debra Nossaman, DVM, FAVD, DAVDC

Most clients are aware of the need for regular cleaning for their pets. Practicing good medicine in dentistry by following the guidelines presented by AAHA and the American Veterinary Dental Society, will allow you to provide additional services other than just a “scale and polish.” This lecture will provide step-by-step standard of care in veterinary dentistry that will reveal perception of value to your clients, add quality years to their pet’s lives, and promote amazing revenue for your practice.

Anesthesia Monitoring Part 1: So Many Blips of the Heart; ECG and IABP • Anesthesia Monitoring Part 2: Follow the Curve; PetCO2 and SpO2

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 1:30 - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Meghan Dakin, CVT, VTS (ECC)



Common Emergencies “Texas Style” 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30 - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Courtney Liermann, LVT, VTS (ECC)

Many emergencies are common across the board no matter where you live in the U.S. However, there are a few emergencies that are more prevalent in the State of Texas. This lecture will cover common emergencies experienced in Texas such as snake envenomations, heatstroke, Sago Palm toxicity, anaphylaxis and marijuana toxicity. This presentation will include a discussion on the pathophysiology of each emergency and how to respond under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

Putting the Pieces Together - Shock Strategies and Types

Shock seems to be a term utilized often in general conversation, but what does it mean in a clinical sense? For this lecture, Courtney will cover the clinical signs we would see during various stages of shock and the types of shock that paint a clinical picture. Utilizing these signs, support staff can communicate concerns appropriately and be able to anticipate the needs of a doctor when time is precious.

It’s Not All Catheters and Blood Pressures—Protocol Creation and Communication Skills

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (4 credits)

Megan Brashear, BS, CVT, VTS

Successful veterinary technicians can do more than hit that collapsed, dehydrated cat vein. Effective veterinary staff are looking at the bigger picture – they are looking at how they can practice better medicine more efficiently. The best veterinary technicians are also those who can communicate effectively not only to clients, but to each other and to their managers. These four hours will be an entertaining session on medical and hospital protocols – recognizing the need and how to create effective protocols. The implementation of any new protocol requires excellent communication, and we will then discuss communication styles and pitfalls that trouble every veterinary hospital. Utilizing case studies and examples that can be implemented right away, this session will get you excited to get organized!

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

Accidental Pet Care Shaming

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (4 credits)

Ernie Ward, DVM

It happens. Every team member at one time or another makes communication blunders that cause big trouble with clients. The problem is we may be making more communication mistakes than we realize, costing us dearly with compliance, care, and loyalty. This session will review some of the most frequent comments that create the biggest headaches. You may discover you’re using these phrases or tactics more often than you’d like. This session will help make great teams even greater communicators.

Collaborative Communications, Front vs. Back: Working as a Team

Conflict rarely arises suddenly. It emerges over time, and when it does it can have a big impact on practice revenue, client retention and more. Honest and open communication is key. Good team communication underpins every aspect of good veterinary practice. It can increase overall job satisfaction, after-care compliance, enhance pet owner satisfaction and most importantly better pet health outcomes. Keep your clinic team in sync by learning the important steps to achieve effective communication.

Employment Contracts: Make it a Good One; Understanding Your Non-Compete, Partnership: Do it Right!

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. (3 credits)

Ky Mortensen, JD, MBA

This three-part series of lectures begins with a focus on employment contracts, explaining the function of the veterinary employment agreement, providing a detailed analysis of its essential components, and answers the question of whether or not you need to utilize employment contracts in your practice.

The second part of the session focuses on the non-compete portion of the employment agreement. Geared to both employers and employees, this presentation provides a detailed analysis of the non-compete, non-solicitation, and confidentiality provisions of a veterinary employment agreement along with practical advice on when these provisions may be necessary and how to ensure that what you intend to protect truly is protected.

The session concludes with a presentation on partnerships, exploring the value and the challenges of veterinary partnerships and provides insight on how to be a great partner in business, how to get the most from your existing partnerships and key things to look for in the selection of new partners.

The Five Fundamentals of Financial Planning and a Guided Interactive Tour of Dr. I Need a Plan’s Financial House

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30 - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Darby Affeldt, DVM

Reaching personal and practice financial goals is important to everyone, yet as unique to each person as their own DNA. As practices grow and become profitable, the need for proper planning deepens, both for the practice and personally. Since there is no one-size-fits-all approach, but there are critical fundamentals increase your chances of financial success, we'll delve into those fundamentals, then build upon them to explore what a formal, custom financial plan actually is. We will discuss why specific steps are important to reach individual and practice goals. With a galaxy of financial strategies available out there, we'll explore how vitally important it is to understand the value of a formal plan to decide what to implement; fitting these strategies together, like puzzle pieces, interdependent on one another, deliberately and specifically placed.

  • We'll explore a myriad of questions and discuss when/where to go for answers and help:
  • Google; does it hurt or help?
  • What are financial risks that we all face?
  • How to leverage for growth/opportunity?
  • Debt; What is good, bad and how does timing matter?
  • Is it possible to juggle multiple financial goals?
  • How can we use time on our side?
  • What are financial Defensive and Offensive strategies?
  • What is Decumulation?
  • Investments; where, when and how to begin?
  • Taxation and Wealth erosion; how and why to implement strategies*
  • When can we retire – how would we know?

Improving Revenue and Retention: Empowering Credentialed Technicians

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 1:30 - 3:00 p.m. (1.5 credits)

David Sessum, LVT

This lecture will discuss the educational process of LVT’s and how to better utilize credentialed personnel in any veterinary practice to improve revenue through fully utilizing licensed professionals to help to build a culture of empowerment that creates revenue and retains employees. Topics to be discussed include: fee capturing, client communication, utilizing LVT’s and their education to benefit your practice and empowering your employees to improve retention.

Mastering Your Memory

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. (2 credits)

Tyler Enslin

The human brain possesses an incredible amount of power to store and recall information. Unfortunately, most people are never taught how to fully access this ability. In this fun and highly engaging training program you will learn unique and exciting methods to increase your memory skills to extraordinary levels. Most importantly, discover how to use these new skills in daily life. Instantly recalling people’s names, giving presentations without notes, and improved mental organization are just a few of the practical benefits from this intriguing program. Tyler delivers the training in energetic fashion with no notes or PowerPoint to encourage maximum audience participation and to impart as much value as possible to all who attend.

  • Increase overall memory skills
  • Instantly recall names
  • Learn to recall lists in order
  • Lead meetings and give presentations without written notes
  • Improve credibility and remember company information

Organizational Design for the 21st-Century Veterinary Practice

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Robert Trimble, DVM

Do you have a sneaking suspicion that the world seems to be speeding up? That “the next new thing” seems to pop up before you even adopted the “last new thing?” Does it feel like “change” seems to be happening faster and faster?

You’re right. And it has to do with the exponential curve on which technology evolves. Thanks to the rising influence of accelerating technologies like artificial intelligence and the increasing potential for the Internet of Things to disrupt business models, veterinarians in the 21st century have to move faster than ever before– not just to stay relevant, but to survive.

Yet how can veterinary medicine, already saddled with the highest rate of depression and suicide of any medical profession, possibly expect to cope with this rate of change? If we’re already overwhelmed, the thought of adding more on top of it seems like a recipe for disaster.

This session will highlight recent findings from the fields of positive psychology and organizational design. We’ll do a deep dive into the components of a work environment that facilitate positive well-being and apply this learning to adaptive organizational design. Its goal is to empower you with ideas that you can use to create a positive workplace environment and to ensure that your organization is adaptable in the face of rapid change.

WELLNESS

Effects of the Opioid Crisis in Veterinary Medicine

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (2.5 credits)

Jack Teitelman

This session will review the state of the opioid crisis today and how it has creeped into the world of veterinary medicine. Jack will help identify the signs and symptoms of drug abuse and addiction in medical professionals and well as clients (including which specific drugs prescribed and dispensed by veterinarians, have become the most widely abused by humans). He will also review how to recognize a potential “doctor shopper” who comes in requesting a specific drug, asking for higher doses, continually reports lost prescriptions or asks for early refills. He also teaches how to inform clients of the dangers of leaving medication available for misuse and the importance of proper storage and disposal of pet prescriptions.

Ethical Dilemmas Faced by Small Animal Veterinarians; Cost of Veterinary Care: Impact on Animal Welfare and Veterinarian Well-Being

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 1:30 - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Barry Kipperman, DVM, DACVIM

Dr. Kipperman will discuss his research on ethical dilemmas veterinarians encounter on a daily basis, beliefs regarding euthanasia and balancing client and animal interests, prevalence and value of ethics training to help mitigate the stressful effects of ethical dilemmas. Dr. Kipperman will also discuss the growing problem of the frequency and degree to which the economic limitations of pet owners influence quality of veterinary care and professional satisfaction.

Mindfulness: The Present of Presence for Yourself and Others

Michele Gaspar, DVM, DABVP

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)

This lecture will introduce the benefits of mindfulness meditation, review the history of the practice and provide time for participants to engage in mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness is a secular, contemplative practice that has been shown to have significant, positive effects on brain structure and function and has been shown to reduce professional burnout.

Healing the Wounded Healer: Techniques to Reduce Stress in High-Intensity Practice

Michele Gaspar, DVM, DABVP

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (3.5 credits)





Moving From Fatigue to Resilience

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 • 1:30 - 5:30 p.m. (3.5 credits)

Jeannine Moga, MA, MSW, LCSW

Knowing how to identify stress/distress is important but constructing a pro-active resilience plan—whether for yourself or your team—is equally critical to thriving in practice over the long haul. This interactive workshop will enable participants to construct a personalized plan for building the skills necessary for optimizing productivity, engagement, purpose and joy -- both at work and at home.

  1. Learn to explore the neuropsychology of resilience and explain why our best work – and our best selves – comes from learning to how to meet adversity with curiosity and flexibility.
  2. This session will review the cognitive, emotional, social, and spiritual skills that enable agility, compassion, and innovation to emerge.
  3. Construct a realistic take-home plan that enables participants to start recovering from professional strain and create a more satisfying work/home life.

Straight Talk: Veterinary Mental Health and the Challenge of Staying Well in Practice

This presentation will explore why veterinary professionals struggle to maintain the enthusiasm and passion that brought them to veterinary practice, as well as why they manifest stress-related syndromes at such high rates. Current research on both veterinary mental health and veterinary resilience will be reviewed, with an eye toward demystifying how chronic stress impacts personal and professional wellness over time.

  1. This session will explore the causes and consequences of compassion fatigue, burnout, and chronic stress in veterinary practice.
  2. Learn to differentiate between stress-related syndromes and the mental health conditions that may erupt when these syndromes go un-addressed.
  3. Learn to improve your ability to identify – and respond to – indicators of distress in yourself and others.
Early Bird Registration: $395/DVM members, $495/DVM non-members • $175/LVT members, $200/Hospital Staff non-members by January 21

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