SATURDAY, MARCH 5

COMPANION ANIMAL

8 a.m.to 12 p.m.(3.5 CE credits)

Mast Cell Tumors: The Latest and Greatest; Lymphoma: Anything New?; Vaccine-Associated Sarcomas: Myth or Reality?; Top 10 Recent Advances in Veterinary Oncology
Philip Bergman, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (oncology)
Mast Cell Tumors: The Latest and Greatest - Mast cell tumors are extremely common tumors in the dog and are now beginning to be understood as a disease entity in the cat. The diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approach to mast cell tumors in dogs and cats will be presented. In addition, the latest in therapeutic and prognostic alternatives will be presented. Participants gain a better understanding of recommended staging diagnostics, therapies and prognoses for dogs and cats diagnosed with mast cell tumors. They will also become more fluent in the latest histopathologic grading systems and new treatments available. Lymphoma: Anything New? - Lymphoma is the most common tumor of the cat and one of the most common tumors in the dog. The diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approach to this tumor will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the various treatment protocols available as well as options for rescue chemotherapy in dogs and cats. The lecture participant will better understand the recommended staging diagnostics, therapies and prognoses for dogs and cats diagnosed with lymphoma. Attendees will also become more fluent in the latest new treatments available such as Tanovea and Laverdia-CA1. Feline Vaccine-Associated Sarcoma - Myth or Reality? - Fibrosarcomas are relatively common in the cat. It is of utmost importance in cats to differentiate vaccine or injection site-associated sarcoma (VAS) from non-vaccine-associated sarcoma as the prognosis and treatments are vastly different. Emphasis will be placed on the history, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy of cats with VAS. The lecture participant will better understand the recommended staging diagnostics, therapies and prognoses for cats diagnosed with VAS. Practitioners will also become more fluent in the latest information in the scientific literature related to the relationship between VAS and adjuvants. Top 10 Recent Advances in Veterinary Oncology - Many clients with pets expect the same level of care from their veterinarians as they expect for themselves from their physician. This is especially true for clients with pets that have cancer. To provide this level of care, one must understand and employ the recent advances in medical, surgical and radiation oncology that will be presented in this discussion. Participants will better understand the latest clinically relevant recent advances in veterinary oncology that include: (1) exciting new diagnostics like the BRAF urine test, (2) new treatments like Tanovea, Stelfonta and Oncept, (3) recommended staging diagnostics like chest CT, (4) pharmacogenetic testing, and (5) an update on USP 800 and compounding pharmacies.

8 a.m. to 12 p.m. (3.5 CE credits)
Strategies for Avoiding and Treating Resistant Surgical Site Infections, Forelimb Lameness: Is it the Elbow or the Shoulder? Orthopedic Bandaging Principles
Caleb Hudson, DVM, DACVS
Strategies for Avoiding and Treating Resistant Surgical Site Infections will review strategies for decreasing infection risk such as preoperative patient preparation protocols, perioperative antimicrobial therapy and implant coatings. Options for treating resistant surgical site infections such as local antibiotic delivery, appropriate systemic antimicrobial therapy and antimicrobial agents other than antibiotics will be discussed. Participants should leave this talk with ideas for how to alter perioperative protocols to decrease the risk of postoperative infection, a clear idea of how to diagnose surgical site infection and a better understanding of newer options that are available to effectively combat resistant surgical site infections. Forelimb Lameness: Is it the Elbow or the Shoulder? - This talk will provide an overview of the common orthopedic diseases that result in forelimb lameness in dogs. The talk will cover practical techniques to facilitate gait analysis in the clinic as well as outlining the principles of performing a thorough orthopedic examination of the front limbs. Diagnostic imaging modalities that are applicable to the diagnosis of forelimb lameness will be reviewed, including the applicability and basic interpretation of radiographs, CT scan and MRI scan. Specific disease processes that result in forelimb lameness will be reviewed in systematic fashion, including typical presenting signs, diagnostic imaging findings, treatment options and expected outcomes of treatment. At the end of the talk, attendees should have achieved a deeper understanding of the common diseases that result in canine forelimb lameness as well as an understanding of the typical process for diagnosing and treating each of these conditions. Orthopedic Bandaging Principles - This talk will cover the principles behind bandage application including bandage layers, types of bandages and how to apply them, indications for particular bandage types, principles behind splint applications and how to avoid bandage complications. Participants should leave this talk with an understanding of how to select the appropriate type of bandage for an individual patient’s disease process as well as an understanding of common pitfalls that may occur when placing bandages. Participants should also understand when to apply special use bandages such as Ehmer slings or Spica splints.

1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.(3.5 CE credits)
Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia (IMHA), Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenia (IMT) and Immunosuppressive Therapy
Andrew Mackin, DVS, MS
The first session will cover practical approaches to the diagnosis of IMHA in the dog and cat. Attendees will develop an understanding of the pathogenesis of IMHA and learn to recognize the typical presentation of a patient with IMHA and end with developing a structured diagnostic approach to patients with suspected IMHA. During the second session, the presenter will review practical approaches to the diagnosis of IMT in the dog and cat followed by how to develop an understanding of the pathogenesis of IMT. Participants will begin to recognize the typical presentation of a patient with IMT and learn to develop a structured diagnostic approach to patients with suspected IMT. Last, but not least, Dr. Mackin will give an overview of immunosuppressive therapy in the dog and cat. He will help participants understand the indications for using immunosuppressive agents in the dog and cat, the strengths and limitations of glucocorticoids as immunosuppressive agents and assist everyone with developing a working knowledge of the immunosuppressive agents cyclophosphamide, chlorambucil, azathioprine, cyclosporine, leflunomide and mycophenolate mofetil.

1:30 to 5:30 p.m. (3.5 CE credits)
Treatment and Monitoring of Diabetes Mellitus; Monitoring Cushingoid Dogs on Trilostane: What’s New?
Patty Lathan, VMD, MS, DACVIM
Treatment and Monitoring of Diabetes Mellitus – This session will cover the current recommendations for treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. There will also be an overview of different modalities for monitoring patients receiving insulin. Dr. Lathan will review insulins that are being used to treat diabetic dogs and cats, what are the current dietary recommendations, different monitoring modalities for diabetes and the pros/cons of each. Cushing’s Monitoring – For the first part of Dr. Lathan’s session, she will focus on monitoring strategies for patients receiving trilostane. She will follow with the primary goals of management of a patient with hyperadrenocorticism, how to choose a starting dose of trilostane and the benefits of SID versus BID dosing. She will conclude with how to monitor a patient using clinical signs and cortisol testing.

HOSPITAL STAFF

8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Dental Charting and Terminology; Digital Dental Radiology for the Dog and Cat
Thomas W. Koenig, LVT (TAMU-CVM)
Correct charting and terminology are very important to correctly identify normal and abnormal conditions in your dental patients. Terminology is the language of our profession; correct usage is essential. The second part of Tommy’s presentation will cover the positioning for dental digital x-rays along with how to identify normal and abnormal anatomy and pathology.

8 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Pain Management in the Critical Patient; Intra-operative Hypotension; Top 5 Local Blocks for Your Practice
Tasha McNerney, BS, CVT, CVPP, VTS (Anesthesia/Analgesia)
Pain Management in the Critical Patient - This lecture will examine how important proper pain management is for critical patients. Often these patients are compromised, making drug selection more nuanced. We will discuss analgesic options for specific cases such as trauma patients, emergency cesarean patients and urethral obstruction patients. This lecture will allow paraprofessionals to weigh all analgesic options (analgesic drugs as well as alternative therapies) when creating a plan for a critical patient. Intra-operative Hypotension - This session will cover one of the most important monitoring parameters during surgery: blood pressure. Most patients experience some degree of hypotension while under anesthesia just due to the drugs we use. We will discuss the reasons why patients experience hypotension as well as ways the LVT or assistant can intervene should hypotension develop. Top 5 Local Blocks for Your Practice - Tasha will review the pharmacology and physiology of utilizing local anesthetic drugs in your veterinary practice. There are many simple local anesthetics your practice can utilize to enhance the analgesia and comfort of your patients. Drugs, techniques and supplies will be discussed so after this lecture you can implement these blocks in your practice.

1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Finding Waldo and the Scroll with Automated Microscopy What's the Diagnosis?; Test Your Knowledge in 20 Large and 20 Small Animal Cases; Common Parasites of Rodents, Rabbits and Hedgehogs
Dwight Bowman, PhD, DACVIM (Hon.)
Finding Waldo and the Scroll with Automated Microscopy What's the Diagnosis? - As we move to being able to perform fecal examinations with computers recognizing different parasite stages in blood smears, Pap tests and slides from fecal preps, the talk will review the history of the development of the methodologies, and it will examine what it takes to train the machines and look at what these methods can and cannot due as of the time of the presentation.
Test Your Knowledge in 20 Large and 20 Small Animal Cases - Cases of 20 large animal parasitisms will be presented to the audience and will gather audience feedback as to the diagnosis of these animal parasite cases that may be common or uncommon. For each case, we will also discuss means for the prevention of such cases occurring. Common Parasites of Rodents, Rabbits and Hedgehogs - These are becoming a more and more common as companion animals, but at the same time, they are not discussed much in most texts dealing with veterinary parasitology. This presentation will discuss the common parasites occurring in these hosts and will present what is known about the treatment and prevention of these parasites, for which few if any drugs are approved.

1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Case Studies on Ethics and Task Delineation for LVTs and Other Hospital Staff
David Sessum, LVT, and Jessica Colborn, DVM (Additional Speaker TBD)
Case Studies on Ethics and Task Delineation for LVTs and Other Hospital Staff - Even though LVTs have been licensed by the State of Texas for several years now, there still seems to be some uncertainty about what separates the LVT from other clinic staff. This panel will discuss the proper use of nomenclature in a veterinary practice, task delineation and required levels of supervision for hospital staff. Case studies of ethical dilemmas will be presented for discussion. Controlled drugs, social media and other issues encountered in veterinary medicine will be discussed.

LARGE ANIMAL

8 a.m. to 12 p.m. (3.5 CE credits)
Update and Overview of the Equine Microbiota; Gastrointestinal Microbiota Alterations in Horses Including Use of Probiotics; Management of Complicated Equine Wounds
Canaan Whitfield, DVM, PhD, DACVS, DACVSMR (TAMU-CVM)
Update and Overview of the Equine Microbiota – Dr. Whitfield will provide an overview of current knowledge of the microbiota of horses. We will discuss the microbiota of various body systems including GI tract, respiratory tract and uterus, among others. A major focus will be discussing the clinical implications of this current knowledge. Gastrointestinal Microbiota Alterations in Horses Including Use of Probiotics - This presentation will focus specifically on the equine gastrointestinal microbiota. We will discuss the impacts of the GI microbiota on GI diseases as well as non-GI diseases. In addition, substantial discussion will revolve around how we, as veterinarians, can alter the GI microbiota with the use of medications, diet and probiotics. Ultimately, we will tie these interventions back to gastrointestinal health. Management of Complicated Equine Wounds – Attendees can expect to learn about the clinically relevant aspects of the pathophysiology of wound healing. Understanding these principles will guide clinical decision-making for equine wound healing. Rarely do equine wounds heal by primary intention; the vast majority heal by second intention and are managed as open wounds. Options for open wound management including basic wound care along with management of complicated wounds including chronic/infected wounds and wounds containing antimicrobial resistant bacteria all will be covered. Management techniques will be included in the discussion of traditional wound therapy approaches as well as some non-traditional and more advanced techniques.

1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.(3.5 CE credits)
The Unknown About Fevers of Unknown Origin; The Past, Present and Future of Rhodococcus Equi Pneumonia; Equine Asthma: Not Just Another Coughing Horse
Michelle Coleman, DVM, PhD, DACVIM (LA)
The Unknown About Fever of Unknown Origin - The fever of unknown origin is a frustrating clinical problem for equine veterinarians. This lecture will discuss the common causes and the diagnostic approach to the horse with a fever. The Past, Present and Future Rhodococcus Equi - Management of foals with Rhodococcus equi pneumonia has evolved over the past several years as a result of screening practices, antimicrobial resistance and limited antimicrobial options. This session will discuss current recommendations regarding these challenges and obstacles. Equine Asthma: Current Understanding and Future Directions - Significant progress has been made in our understanding of equine asthma in the past decade. Dr. Coleman will highlight your current clinical understanding and future directions of the different asthma phenotypes, the role of infectious and non-infectious causes of equine asthma, genetic factors and our diagnostic capabilities of this important equine disease. With improved understanding of the pathophysiology of different phenotypes of equine asthma, the management and treatment options are expanding. This session will also discuss important approaches to the management and treatment of horses with equine asthma.

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.(3.5 CE credits)
Refueling the Energy Slump: Principle-centered Motivation; Train as a Team: Tips for Positive Learning; Bad Things Good Teams Say: How to Avoid Tiny Comments That Wind Up Making Big Trouble for You
Ernie Ward, DVM
Refueling the Energy Slump: Principle-centered Motivation - Motivating people requires lots of energy. Encouraging positive attitudes, creativity and exceptional client service and patient care demands constant input and focus from practice leaders. If we want sustainable growth and happiness, we must be guided by our core principles and beliefs. Our principles are used to navigate life’s challenges and remind us why we work hard. The real test is if you can survive the trials and tribulations of practice life with your core beliefs intact. To help retain your principles, reach your potential and motivate and energize your team, Dr. Ward shares eight energy injections to resuscitate the power in your practice. Train as a Team: Tips for Positive Learning - Our clinic’s success rests squarely on the abilities of our staff. Yet too often we fail to provide our teams with the tools and skills necessary to attain success. Whether you need to radically reinvent your practice culture due to economic pressures or you simply want to improve your standards of care, change can present a challenge for many veterinarians. This session will address creating a staff-training program that encourages adaptability, flexibility and embraces change in a positive manner. Bad Things Good Teams Say: How to Avoid Tiny Comments That Wind Up Making Big Trouble for You - It happens. Every team member makes communication blunders that cause big trouble with clients occasionally. The problem is we may be making more communication mistakes than we realize, costing us dearly with compliance, care and loyalty. This session will review some of the most frequent comments that create the biggest headaches. You may discover you’re using these phrases or tactics more often than you’d like. This session will help make your great team even greater communicators.

 

SPECIAL PROGRAM

10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (2 CE credits)
Controlled Drugs Regulatory Compliance; Overview of DEA Regulations
Mike Tacker (TBVME) and Danyelle Pennington (DEA)
This course will discuss opioid abuse, drug diversion, inventory and security. This course will further identify rules and statutes pertaining to controlled drugs, security of controlled drugs and storage of controlled drugs. Danyelle will go over DEA regulations as they pertain to scheduled drugs in the veterinary clinic. This two-hour course is approved by the Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners and is required for license renewal every two years beginning in September 2022 for veterinarians licensed in the state of Texas.